Wood, Edward F.R.

E.F.R. Wood papers, 1856–1959.
4 boxes, and 1 small box (2 linear feet).
About Edward F.R. Wood

Edward F.R. Wood, Jr. (1921-2000) was a vice president in the trust department of PNC Bank and an author of histories of sailing and shipbuilding in Mattapoisett, Massachusetts. He spent summers in Mattapoisett from the time he was a child, and was an avid sailor. His books include Sailing Days at Mattapoisett and Old Mattapoisett. In 2004 he co-authored The Ports of Old Rochester: Shipbuilding at Mattapoisett and Marion with Judith Lund.

About the collection

This collection of Edward F. R. Wood, Jr. papers includes scrapbooks, photographs, research materials, and ephemera. The scrapbooks, consisting primarily of clippings of newspaper stories and illustrations, are on a variety of nautical topics, such as the Merchant Marine, yachting, maritime disasters, and steamers. Photographs, negatives, postcards, and ephemera document several New England coastal steamer lines, with a small amount of material related to steamer lines operating out of other East Coast ports. There is an index file of steamships, with some notes about owners, gross tonnage, and references to articles on the ships. The collection also includes microfilm of holdings in the National Archives related to small craft in use during the Civil War; a 1856 bill of lading from the Swiftsure Line; and a reproduction of a photograph of Smith and Windmill Islands in the Delaware River.

Subjects
  • Marine accidents
  • Merchant marine–United States
  • Steamboat lines
  • Yachting
Types of material
  • Ephemera
  • Microforms
  • Negatives (Photographic)
  • Photographs
  • Postcards
  • Scrapbooks
  • Research notes
Reference files
  • America’s Cup (?) [per survey, there's a scrapbook on this topic in the collection -- should we add it to description?]
  • Shipwrecks
This entry was posted in Civil War, Maritime Disasters, Sailboats and Sailing, Steamships and Steamboats, Tugboats and Harbor Craft, US Merchant Marine. Bookmark the permalink.

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