Liener, Josef

Josef Liener collection of Philadelphia Naval Shipyard photographs and memoranda, 1916–1957.
1 box, FIX (0.41 linear feet).
About Josef Liener

Josef Liener was a boat designer and builder. Established in 1799, the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard was the first Naval Shipyard in the United Sates. The shipyard was originally located in the Southwark region of Philadelphia, but was later relocated to its present site just upriver from the Philadelphia International Airport. For many years, the workload at the shipyard consisted primarily of new construction and conversions of ships. For example, during World War II the battleship Wisconsin, the aircraft carrier Antietam, and the cruisers Chicago and Los Angeles were launched in a period of seven months. However, during the late 1960s at the direction of Defense Secretary McNamara the Navy gradually phased out of the new construction business, turning this work over to the private sector. The last ship built at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard was the command ship USS Blue Ridge in 1970 and the yard was officially closed in 1995.

About the collection

This is a collection of approximately 450 black and white photos from the Philadelphia Navy Yard. Images document modeling, construction, and testing of vessels at the yard. Ships represented in the photographs include 40-foot and 50-foot utility boats, personnel and rescue boats, minesweeping launches, a LCVP (landing craft vehicle, personnel), and area command cutters. The collection also includes some photographs of personnel. Memos from the Industrial Department of the Navy Yard in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and from the Navy Department, dated 1921 and 1942-1943, relate to materials and procedures to be used in glue-laminated wood construction.

Subjects
  • Philadelphia Naval Shipyard (Philadelphia, Pa.)
  • Naval Architecture
Types of material
  • Photographs
Reference files
  • Philadelphia Naval Shipyard
This entry was posted in Military Support Vessels, Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Photo-rich Collections, Shipbuilding and Shipyards, Shipyard Workers. Bookmark the permalink.

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