Cooper, Ryan

Ryan Cooper collection of Philadelphia Custom House records, 1821–1925.
3 boxes, 1 folder (3 linear feet).
About Ryan Cooper

Ryan Cooper is a collector of and dealer in nautical antiques. The United States Customs Service (1789-1927) processed paperwork for the import and export of goods into and out of the country. Customs officials also assessed and collected customs fees and penalties. Past functions of the Customs Service included administration of navigation aids and lighthouses, and functions relating to the protection of seamen, and to revenue cutters. In 1927 the Customs Service became the Bureau of Customs.

About the collection

This is a collection of papers of the United States Customs Service of the Port of Philadelphia, from 1821 to 1926, with the major concentration of materials falling between the 1830s and the 1890s. The records illustrate commercial and shipping interests, as well as foreign trade relations, of the United States. Materials include: consular invoices; bills of lading; customs declarations and affadavits of consignees, importers, and agents; surveyor’s office reports of arrivals; inspection records; invoices for goods; receipts for port fees; and miscellaneous correspondence related to customs. The records document shipments of a wide variety of goods and merchandise: wool and textiles, coal, iron, ash, wood, sugar, coffee, salt, fruit, gin, whiskey, wine, and many other items. Ships arrived from Liverpool and other ports in Great Britain, Germany, France, and Holland, as well as various Caribbean ports. These papers were collected by Ryan Cooper.

Subjects
  • United States Custom House (Philadelphia, Pa.)
  • Customs administration–Pennsylvania–Philadelphia
  • Shipping–Pennsylvania–Philadelphia
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)–Commerce
Types of material
  • Bills of lading
  • Receipts (financial records)
Reference files
  • Custom House, Philadelphia
  • Port of Philadelphia
  • Port Records
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