Travel journal

European travel journal of an unidentified Philadelphian, 1836–1837.
1 volume (0.08 linear feet).
About the collection

Journal of an unidentified young man from Philadelphia on his voyage to London, and places on the European Continent. The journal includes detailed information about where he stayed, whom he visited, what he saw and the ship he sailed on from New York to Portsmouth. He left New York on the ship President on November 30, 1836 and arrived in London on December 31, 1836. The writer records the longitude and latitude and the weather combined with personal comments. Upon arrival in Europe, he describes the sights he sees each day, especially in London, where he stays the longest, then Paris, Lyon, Avignon and Marseilles, then by sea to Genoa, Leghorn and Naples. The last entry is dated March 24, 1837.

Subjects
  • Transatlantic voyages
  • President (Ship)
  • London (England) — Description and travel
  • Italy — Description and travel
  • France — Description and travel
Types of material
  • Journals
Posted in Logbooks and Journals, Seafaring Accounts | Leave a comment

Todd Shipyard Corporation

Todd Shipyard Corporation records, circa 1960s.
1 volume (0.08 linear feet).
About Todd Shipyard Corporation

Todd Pacific Shipyards Corporation was founded in 1916 as the William H. Todd Corporation through the merger of Robins Dry Dock and Repair Company of Erie Basin, Brooklyn, New York, the Tietjen and Long Dry Dock Company of Hoboken, New Jersey, and the Seattle Construction and Dry Dock Company. The Seattle shipyard could trace its history back to 1882, when Robert Moran opened a marine repair shop at Yesler’s Wharf. This shop became the Moran Brothers Shipyard in 1906 and the Seattle Construction and Dry Dock Company at the end of 1911.

The tanker Fort Caspar was built in 1945 by Sun Shipbuilding for the U.S. Maritime Commission. In 1962, the ship was rebuilt as a self-unloader by Todd Shipyards Corporation. The rebuilt vessel was renamed Inger. It was owned by Reynolds Metals Co. of Corpus Christi, Texas. The ship was scrapped in 1995.

About the collection

Photo album of bulk carrier Inger converted (“jumboized”) by Todd Shipyard Corporation. The conversions were designed and engineered by J.J. Henry Co, Inc. The completed Inger and her sister ship Walter Rice were prototype self-unloading bulk carriers that transported alumina and sugar under the United States flag. 13 photos of Inger during and after her conversion.

Subjects
  • Inger (Ship)
  • Shipbuilding–New Jersey
  • Ships–Reconstruction
Types of material
  • Photograph albums
Posted in Large Vessel Builders, Photo-rich Collections, Shipbuilding and Shipyards | Leave a comment

Tipton family

Tipton family papers, 1862–1868.
1 box (0.08 linear feet).
Abstract

Collection consists principally of the letters William Tipton sent to his wife and sister during his service as an engineer in the United States Navy aboard the ships Circassian and Sacramento during the Civil War. The Sacramento was charged with searching for Confederate privateers, with her chief target being the Alabama. Tipton writes mostly of personal matters, but also makes some brief comments about the places the ship stops in port, and his life in the Navy. The collection also includes letters from other family members and 12 cartes de visite.

About the Tipton family

William Tipton was an engineer in the U.S. Navy who served aboard the ships Circassian and Sacramento during the Civil War. He held the rank of Acting Second Assistant Engineer in 1862, and was promoted to Acting First Assistant Engineer in 1863. He was honorably discharged from the Navy in 1865.

About the collection

The Tipton family papers consist principally of the letters William Tipton sent home to his wife and sister in Philadelphia during his service as an engineer in the United States Navy aboard the ships Circassian and Sacramento during the Civil War.
The Sacramento was charged with searching for Confederate privateers, with her chief target being the Alabama. On May 1, 1864 he writes to his wife, Carrie, from Cape Town:
“…[W]e are after the Alabama and she left here some 3 weaks ago fore now body nowes whare but supsed she is gone to france for repares and the Capton don’t now what he will do go after her or not There is a rebel steamer the Tuscuylusy laying in Port about 30 miles from here wether we will stay here and watch her is undesident yet she is not ase large as the Alabama but large enofgh to do mischeaf.”
Tipton’s ship does go after Alabama, but is too late to engage her in battle. From Cherbourg, France on July 8, he writes, “We wer gust 8 days behind the alabama when we got here this is where tha had the fight I do wish it had off bin us that would bin glory enoufgh for me.”
Tipton’s loneliness for home and for news of his family and friends are frequent topics in his letters. He does not write a great deal about his work or life on board ship. He makes a few brief comments about the places the ship stops in port, but generally he focuses on personal matters.
“We now have bin to Eingland France Germenny Ireland Brascile Spane Portugal Afracay all the Canery and Westren Ilands I never thought I would sen hafe I have sean I supose it wont do me enny harm as there is a grate meany would give considerable to take this trip but I am tierd ove it I want to go home” (July 29, 1864).
Tipton often chides Carrie for not writing enough and entreats her to look after her health and that of their infant son. “I would love to see you and he but I must wate with pations untill old Abe seas fit to let me see you” (September 13, 1864). Finances are also a concern to Tipton, and he asks his wife to reply to confirm that she has gotten the money he sends. News of Carrie’ s ill health and subsequent death reaches Tipton in the spring of 1865. In his letter of May 5, he writes to his sister Virginia “Jennie” Hopkins, “Oh this cruel war. I ever will blame my self ever going in the Navy and leaveing my dear angel wife.” The last letter from Tipton is dated August 11, 1865 upon his ship’ s return from her voyage, and is concerned with arrangements for the care of his son.
The collection also contains several letters from Carrie Tipton at home in Philadelphia, Jennie Hopkins and others, including one from Carrie’ s doctor specifying her dying wishes, and one partial letter (signature page missing) dated December 15, 1867 describing William Tipton’ s death several days before. Twelve cartes de visite of William Tipton, his wife, his son, his second wife and his sister are also included in the collection.

Subjects
  • Sailors — United States — Correspondence
  • Tipton, Carrie — Correspondence
  • Hopkins, Virginia — Correspondence
  • United States — History — Civil War, 1861-1865 — Personal narratives
  • United States — History — Civil War, 1861-1865 — Naval operations
Types of material
  • Correspondence
Reference files
  • CSS Alabama(?)
Posted in Civil War, Seafaring Accounts, US Navy | Leave a comment

FitzSimons, Thomas

Letter to Peter, John, and James Dowdy from Thomas FitzSimons, 1796.
1 folder (0.08 linear feet).
About Thomas FitzSimons

FitzSimons, Thomas, 1741-1811.

About the collection

Letter dated 1796 May 31, Philadelphia to Peter John and James Dowdy, Montserrat, Fitzsimons requests the assistance of Peter John and James Dowdy in obtaining a copy of the proceedings of the Court of Admiralty against Messers. Clarke and Nightingale of Providence, Rhode Island.

Subjects
  • FitzSimons, Thomas, 1741-1811
  • Dowdy, Peter John
  • Dowdy, James
  • Clarke & Nightingale
Types of material
  • Correspondence
Posted in Law and Insurance | Leave a comment

Clifford, Thomas

Thomas Clifford business papers, 1772–1807.
1 folder (0.08 linear feet).
About Thomas Clifford

Thomas Clifford and Sons was a firm of Philadelphia merchants

About the collection

Two business letters: one letter is addressed to Thomas Clifford & Sons from Bewickes, Timerman & Romero in Cadiz; the other letter is addressed to Thomas Clifford from Fermin de Tastet & Co. in London. Letters discuss the shipment of goods.

Subjects
  • Philadelphia (Pa.) — Commerce — 18th century
Types of material
  • Correspondence
Related collections
  • HSP: Clifford family. Papers, 1722-1832. MS 136 (6 linear ft.)
Posted in Shipping Trade | Leave a comment

Nirdlinger. Theresa B.

Theresa B. Nirdlinger correspondence, 1898–1899.
1 box (0.2 linear feet).
Abstract

Collection of letters received from commanders, paymasters and other naval personnel in response to requests for hat band ribbons from U. S. Navy ships, especially those involved in the war with Spain. Some letters indicate that a hatband was transmitted with them, but the ribbons are not extant. Many correspondents apologize for not having ribbons available to send; some suggest alternate methods of acquiring them.

About Theresa B. Nirdlinger

Theresa B. Nirdlinger was the wife of Frederick G. Nirdlinger, owner of the People’s Theater in the Kensington section of Philadelphia. In the late 1890s she sent letters to commanders, paymasters and other naval personnel in an attempt to collect hat band ribbons from all U. S. Navy ships, especially those involved in the war with Spain.

About the collection

This is a collection of letters received by Theresa Nirdlinger related to her effort to collect U.S. Navy hat band ribbons. Some letters indicate that a hatband was transmitted with them, but the ribbons are not extant. Many correspondents apologize for not having ribbons available to send; some suggest alternate methods of acquiring them. A few correspondents indicate that Mrs. Nirdlinger is not alone in her quest for acquiring these souvenirs. J. A. Smith at the League Island Navy Yard tells her, “I learn today that Mrs. Admiral Howison is a collector of cap ribbons and I am sure is but an amateur as compared with you” (December 14, 1898). J. E. Cann of USS Adams elaborates in his letter of December 22, 1898, “In conclusion beg leave to say I am constantly burdened with letters from people all over the country asking for ribbons to comply with them all would exhaust the stock & require an extra clerk to attend to the correspondence.” Although the letters are not extant in the collection, the responses show that she often sent more than one request to certain people. C. H. Grant is finally able to send a hat ribbon with his letter of January 24, 1899 and remarks that Mrs. Nirdlinger’s “unparalleled perseverance and patience is at last rewarded.”

Subjects
  • United States. Navy — Officers — Correspondence
Types of material
  • Correspondence
Posted in US Navy | Leave a comment

Thayer family

Thayer family papers, 1892–1986.
10 boxes (3.83 linear feet).
About the Thayer family

The Thayers were a prominent Philadelphia-area family at the turn of the 20th century. John Borland Thayer, Jr. was a vice-president of the Pennsylvania Railroad when he died in the sinking of the Titanic on April 15, 1912. For further information about the Thayer family and their experiences aboard that ship, see The Sinking of the S.S. Titanic, by John B. Thayer III and A Night to Remember, by Walter Lord.

About the collection

Collection of ocean liner ephemera including postcards, abstract of log cards, advertising cards and brochures, passenger lists, menus, deck plans, photographs, stationery and baggage tags from ships of more than 40 lines, such as Cunard, White Star, Norddeutscher Lloyd, Red Star, Hamburg-Amerika, United States, and Compagnie Generale Transatlantique (French Line). This collection was initially compiled by John (Jack) B. Thayer III, a survivor of the sinking of the Titanic, and includes a first class passenger list from Titanic, and letters of condolence and memorials for John B. Thayer, Jr., who went down with the ship. Later materials, including much relating to the Queen Elizabeth 2, were added to the collection by John B. Thayer IV.

Subjects
  • Thayer, Marian L.
  • Thayer, John B. (John Borland), 1862-1912
  • Thayer, John B. (John Borland), b. 1884
  • Cunard Steamship Company, ltd.
  • Hamburg-American Line
  • Norddeutscher Lloyd
  • Queen Elizabeth 2 (Ship)
  • Queen Mary (Steamship)
  • Titanic (Steamship)
  • White Star Line
Types of material
  • Ephemera
  • Postcards
  • Brochures
  • Menus
  • Photographs
Reference files
  • French Line [same thing?]
  • Passenger Ships
  • QE2
  • ?Shipwrecks
Posted in Maritime Disasters, Ocean Liners | Leave a comment

Butler, Steuben

Steuben Butler papers, 1807–1833.
1 folder (0.08 linear feet).
About Steuben Butler

Steuben Butler, of Luzerne County, Pennsylvania was a newspaper publisher and editor. His newspapers included the Luzerne Federalist, the Post-Boy, and the Wyoming Herald. Butler died in 1881 at the age of 92.

About the collection

Letters received by Steuben Butler from business associates and family in Philadelphia and New York. Mention of mob violence against British in Philadelphia in letter dated July 3, 1807, and in New York in letter dated August 10 [1812?].

Subjects
  • Butler, Steuben
  • Mobs
  • Philadelphia (Pa.) — Description and travel
  • United States — History — 1801-1809
Types of material
  • Correspondence
Posted in Collection Themes | Leave a comment

Standard Oil Company of New Jersey

Standard Oil Company of New Jersey records, 1932–1951.
3 boxes (1 linear foot).
About Standard Oil Company of New Jersey

The Standard Shipping Company was created as a separate subsidiary of Standard Oil of New Jersey in 1927, but was reabsorbed into the parent company in 1934 as the Marine Department.

About the collection

This is a collection of business records of the Standard Shipping Company. Materials include navigation workbooks, 1940-1951. These volumes appear to have been kept by George Rasmussen, and note movements of the ships, including activities in port and voyages from one port to another. Ships represented include Esso Rochester, Esso Wilmington, Esso Memphis, and SS Glenpool. Other materials include: master’s accounts for SS Paul H. Harwood, 1941-1942, listing disbursements for various expenses, including pay and advances to crew; bulletins of the Standard Shipping Co., from the early 1930s, with articles on a range of subjects such as safety measures, practical information about ports of call, ship news, personnel notes, explosions, boilers, fumigations, lookouts, yachting, and maritime history; and miscellaneous instructions related to marine stores and equipment.

Subjects
  • Petroleum–Transportation
Types of material
  • Account books
  • Business records
  • Newsletters
Reference files
  • Oil Refining, Shipping
  • Petroleum Industry and Trade
Posted in Shipping Trade, Tankers and Cargo Vessels | Leave a comment

Lake, Simon

Simon Lake papers, 1921–1934.
1 folder (0.08 linear feet).
About Simon Lake

Simon Lake, born in 1866, was a mechanical engineer and naval architect. He was the inventor of even-keel type submarines and built Argonaut, in 1897, which was the first submarine to operate successfully in the open sea. He also invented submarine apparatus for locating and recovering sunken vessels and their cargoes, and a heavy-oil internal combustion engine for marine use. Lake died in 1945.

About the collection

Collection consists of two letters sent by Simon Lake of Milford, Connecticut: one to Henry Woodhouse dated August 1, 1921, regarding the commercial possibilities of submarines; and one to the Editor of the Los Angeles Times dated November 6, 1934, regarding Lake’s contract for the recovery of HMS Hussar.

Subjects
  • Submarines (Ships)
  • Hussar (Ship)
  • Lake, Simon, 1866-1945
Types of material
  • Correspondence
Posted in Submarines | Leave a comment